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miranda rights to the boston bombing suspect. but once they do, if they do, it changes a whole lot. and we have breaking news on this. moments ago, guess who wants to represent the defendant? we'll tell you next. >>> plus, the now dead suspect has recently -- had recently promoted the rantings of a radical cleric who calls on children to defend islam, and to be taught there is nothing better than wanting to die as a martyr. we'll ask who the shaikh is and find out what was posted on the older brother's youtube channel which are chilling. and do you know your... blood type? a or b positive?? have you eaten today? i had some lebanese food for lunch. i love the lebanese. i... i'm not sure. enough of the formalities... lets get started shall we? jimmy how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? happier than dracula volunteering at a blood drive. we have cookies... get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. polaris has what you wan legdary atvs led by the powerful sportsman 850 ho. value-minded side-by-sides featuring the new ranger 80
was read his miranda rights. the special agent who filed the complaint would that according to surveillance footage. younger suspect lifted the phone to his ear shortly about before the second blast. after he finishes you see people around him react to the first explosion. bomber two virtually alone in front of the individuals in front of the restaurant while he appears calm. he walks away without his knapsack, having left it on the ground where he had been standing. approximately ten seconds later an explosion occurs in that location where bomber two had placed his knapsack. and another major development, the white house said it would not designate the suspect an enemy combatant. we will have more on the legal aspect of this coming up later this hour. as of this hour dzhokhar is in serious condition. he is unable to speak because of a gunshot to the throat which we believe was self-inflicted. he's communicating by writing and nodding his head. as authorities move forward in a of in their investigation, tritening information about the radical past of the brothers is in fact emerging. both t
made without a miranda warning or made while he's not really competent between times when he's sedated and not sedated. so they may be risking their death penalty, but they may be doing it for a good reason. they may need realtime intelligence, but i don't think that the public safety exception will stand up for allowing them not to have given the miranda warnings. >> fascinating. in fact, i have a lot of questions about that i'm going to get to. and actually i want to bring in another colleague as well right now. steve razor is a former military judge advocate general and knows a thing or two about this military issue. typically, steve, we hear about a 48-hour window and this is a very new area of justice. this has only been in sort of parlay for the last couple of years. we are far outside of that 48 hours by today. but can it be extended in the case of public safety? and exactly when can you establish that a public safety exemption has expired or is no longer of concern? how long can you keep him from getting miranda? >> well, there's no hard and fast rule on that. and that's exactl
the charges, miranda rights, the public safety exemption, where are we right now on that issue? >> well, the normal rule is that when someone's irsed, they're advised of their rights. you have the right to remain silent. anything you say can be used against you. you have the right to a lawyer. if you can't afford one it will be provided, that sort of thing. if police don't give that warning then they cannot use any statements of the defendant in court. the exception to that is called the public safety exception. it's been extended by judges to terrorism cases. and the idea is that if you need information quickly to preserve public safety, you can ask those questions and still use the responses in court. but that public safety exception rule is limited. it only applies for several hours after fill in the blank. we assume after questioning starts rather than after arrest. probably no more than a day, day and a half. >> where do you come up with that? pete, let me interrupt you there. who has come up with what is the time? is it just, you know it when you see it? >> in terms of the time li
clam up and ask for an attorney. he's already been read his miranda rights by the fbi. but if he does have some sort of a political issue, some sort of a grudge that he wants people to know about, he may feel it's in his best interest to talk and that is certainly what law enforcement is hoping. they still want to find out are there other suspects, are there people who were accomplices in one way or another, either at helping to plan the bombing, helping plan the subsequent activities, helping plan the manufacture of this device. they want to know why these people did this and more importantly, how they went about doing it, any other people of foreign or domestic, they were in contact with and if he starts to talk, that will obviously help the investigation tremendously. >> anderson, you've done a great job today. thank you very much for now. i want to turn to cnn's brian todd in watertown, who shot exclusive video of the boat while the bombing suspect was still inside it. brian, a quite dramatic end game here to what has been an appalling few days for the people of watertown in parti
to the miranda rule. they've not advised him of his rights. so they can only ask about potential threats to public safety. were there other conspirators, other bombs out there, any reason to believe that public safety is in any way jeopardized. >> pete, one of the persons cited in terms of this idea that there may have been more violent plans on order at the hands of the brothers is this person who was hijacked by the brothers on thursday night. and the driver of a mercedes suv. we know that he's been cooperating with police. is there anything else that we know about his involvement in all of this? >> yeah, the business about new york is very iffy, frankly. i've emailed briefly with this person. he claims that he escaped with they stopped at a gasoline station. but he's also told the police that he was told by these two men, that they were the marathon bombers. but that they were not going to kill him because he was not an american. what he told the police was, that he thought they were speaking arabic. that's probably not the case, they were probably speaking russian or some dialect. an
, the first appearance was with judge marianne boulder and she was there to review his miranda rights with him, among other things. you've been hearing a lot about miranda rights. there's issue at play here that need to be clarified. we're going to read a couple of the things said from the hearing. we have the transcript. the judge said, quoting here, you have been charged with one use of a weapon often mass destruction and malicious destruction of property resulting in death. the case is being prosecuted in part by william weinreb. the maximum penalty on each count is death or imprisonment for any terms of years, or life. and there was this finding from the judge, and this one is important. quote, i find that the defendant is alert, mentally competent, and lucid. he is aware of the nature of the proceedings. okay? so that is the basis for the discussion. joined by retired superior court judge isaac borenstein in boston. he's done hospital visits over his 22 years as a judge. let us begin with the idea, confusion and frustration about miranda rights. give them right away, if you don't give the
authorities say he does not need to be read his miranda rights. >> right. first of all, let's just remember he may be in no physical condition to answer questions with or without miranda warnings. so his physical condition is the great unknown here which may render this whole dispute about miranda moot. let's assume that he is in a condition to answer questions. usually when someone is arrested, they get miranda warnings, and then they is a choice of whether to answer questions or not. here the government has said when there is an imminent danger to public safety, they can question without miranda warnings. that has traditionally or usually been interpreted to mean a future danger to public safety. the so-called ticking time bomb. tell us what's going to happen in the future, and we're not going to worry about miranda. what makes this an unusual invocation of the public safety exception is that the government is saying there is no more danger. there is no further conspirator out there. the government's position may be somewhat internally contradictory. that's something to keep an eye on as thi
, everyone grows with racle-gro. >>> there was no miranda warning given. that they were claiming a public safety exception. could we get an explanation for that. >> there is a public safety exemption in cases of national security and charges involving acts of terrorism and so the government has that opportunity right now, though i believe that the suspect has been taken to a hospital. >> you heard it right there. no miranda rights were read to the suspect here last night. a justice department official says the bombing suspect won't be read the miranda rights because of a public saflt exception. so what is the next judicial step? let's ask the executive director of the american center for law and justice. good morning. i think a lot of folks are not familiar with this public safety exemption. why invoke that at this time? >> usually it's rare, it would be an instance where there is a gun or some kind of in this situation, unexploded bombs. it's important for people to understand, this is not the most extreme move. what you get from this is very limited interrogation and on top of that, it
miranda rights to keep him in a gray area right now whether or not he would be considered an enemy combatant or information that he would be allowing to investigators may not be used against him if he were try to be tried as an american civilian. as i talked there with roger about the fact that congressman peter king over the weekend said the homeland is the battlefield and that times have really changed, what are your thoughts about what the congressman has said about the fbi and that they may have missed red flags and the fact that the homeland is the battlefield? >> as you know, thomas, the fbi conducts thousands of interviews like this. i will say that they do a good job. i would say unless there was some evidence that would lead them to not do something to this individual, i would say they did a good job. i think my colleague, peter king, is not just monday morning quarterbacking but arm chair quarterbacking. we don't no what our investigative authorities know. i would say let them do their job. we can comment but when we start pointing fingers, i think we just add to the conf
. that was a controversial thing at the time. people thought he should have been not given a miranda warning. it turned out he was questioned for a time and then given his miranda warning and the police said he kept talking. they used it as a textbook example. this will remain a controversial decision. it is the stated policy of the obama administration to take anyone like this who creates a crime in the united states and treat them in the regular civilian justice system. they will take him away. when the appropriate time comes, begin to question him. >> pete, i got an e-mail using a term of art in law enforcement. somebody said, remember, this is a federal show. >> meaning the fbi is in charge. we have already heard some members of the senate say this person should be declared an enemy combatant, not given miranda warning and should be subject to a military-style interrogation. the obama administration will never go for that. they believe suspects who commit crimes here should be treated in the criminal justice system. that's what they will intend to do. >> michael leiter who was, among other things, in t
, this investigation still very much continuing. justice departments saying the suspect will not be read his miranda rights. they are invoking the public safety exception. it's allowed in cases of immediate danger. meanwhile mccain and lindsay graham said dzhokhar tsarnaev should be treated as a potential enemy combatant. they said now that the suspect is in custody is the last thing we should want is for him to remain silent. under a law of war we can hold the suspect to a enemy combatment not entitled to miranda warnings or the appointment of counsel. the older brother, he was killed on friday, and they investigated him at the request of a foreign government, and they did not find any ties to terrorism. and we are joined from london by a counterterrorism expert, and mike sullivan here is a former acting director of the bureau of tobacco, firearms and explosives. let's start with you in london, will. the fbi talked to this man in 2011. it does beg the question, did they miss something when they talked to tamerlan tsarnaev? >> well, it's always very difficult to say. however, having said that, if yo
him before he receives miranda warning is the right thing to do. a short time ago, the aclu put out a statement saying every defendant is entitled to defend miranda lights. five lawmakers want him treated as an enemy combatant. 53 people remain in boston hospitals today, three in critical condition, including a 7-year-old girl. nbc news national investigative correspondent michaels i cough is in boston, ron allen outside boston's beth israel medical center where the suspect and many of the victims are being kept and kristen we willinger at the white house, let's get to the latest on investigation. for that, we turn to michaels i cough, again, in boston. what is the fbi focusing on today and moving forward? >> reporter: federal prosecutors are focusing on drafting a criminal complaint we could see as early as this afternoon, detailing the criminal charges against him supported by an affidavit from an fbi agent that would lay out some details of the plot. not all of them but could provide crucial new information for us about what tsarnaev actually did and raise and shed some light on
understand if he is indeed conscious and does survive before reading him miranda rights; is that correct? >> i believe molly line will be talking about that a little bit as well. there is a loophole. there is a way they don't have to. so he was not read his miranda rights to allow to ask questions of him. we don't know if questions have been asked. they may have asked questions of him when he was under the situation he was in, of course being pretty seriously injured. they do believe he is going to make it. that was something, not only important for them to do that because that is what we do in this society but important because of this investigation. last night we were told he was being brought here for treatment. we weren't too far behind the ambulance. as you made your way through boston, you could see many of the businesses reopened. you saw restaurants and bars reopened. at one point there was a small college and 500 students had gone into the streets and blocked off all four lanes cheering, holding signs and as first responders and medical teams came through that had nothing to do
condition. a lot of talk about miranda. michael you prosecuted richard reid the shoe bomber in federal court. how unusual is it to not read miranda warnings? >> case specific. if there is an imminent public safe itty concern they should exercise the miranda exception under public safety and try to get as much information as they possibly can in order to protect the public. i think it is perfectly legitimate under these circumstances. >> judge jeanine: jay, to you when we talk about the public safety exception here. how long is that exception good for are? how long can they go without reading him his rights? >> there is no definitive statement but most people believe it is 48 hours. you a situation here where the distort accused is not conscious are in to even speak so 48 hours. points to a fundamental problem with thinking about mir randiesing. do we want a prosecution or an investigation to determine how deep the terrorist links might be and whether there were additional plans for terror activity. an awful load of weapons that the two possessed. the situation with the travel to russia. all
given all that's transpired over the last week. >> he was not read his miranda rights which a lot of people are talking about today. explain the reason why. >> well, in the law there's what they have called a public safety exception to miranda. everybody knows what miranda is. you have the right to remain silent. anything you say can and will be used against you. the police don't have to say that to you if they are in hot pursuit of something relating to public safety. maybe worried about bombs in this case. they're worried about another plot or something else happening. so under those circumstances authorities do not have to give the miranda warning immediately to a suspect. a lot of people out there saying on the right that they ought not give miranda rights or any other kinds of rights to people who are deemed terrorists. people on the left saying you ought to use the regular court to try to try these individuals. this is an ongoing debate about the law in this country. >> let's talk about the penalty that the younger suspect may face. we're still waiting for charges to be file
his miranda rights, read miranda rights just getting that as you were wrapping up. adam housley live in boston. adam, thank you. investigators are furiously trying to track down the terrorism connection to this case. and they are focusing on a trip, the older brother made last year. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge is here tonight with an update on that. good evening, catherine. >> thank you, bret. some of the most compelling evidence and preliminary evidence comes from surveillance video and one eyewitness during that carjacking thursday night before a shootout with police one of the brothers said, quote: did you hear about the boston explosion? i did that. court records filed monday show the tsarnaev brothers walked into boylston street together 11 minutes before the explosions, each with a backpack. they split up. one heading for the finish line and the other toward the forum restaurant, the site of the second explosion. 30 seconds before the first blast. the started fidgeting with cell phone after the blast almost everyone turned around, quote: apparent bewil
are not reading his miranda rights and what this means for you, when we come back. mb luck? or good decisions? ones i've made. ones we've all made. about marriage. children. money. about tomorrow. here's to good decisions. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. ready to plan for your family's future? we'll help you get there. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. [ children laughing ] ♪ ...is the smell of salt in the air. ♪ it's the sound a seashell makes. [ seagulls calling ] away...is a place that's beyond your imagination, yet well within your means. find your away. for a dealer and the rv that's right for you, visit gorving.com. >>> usa! usa! usa! usa! usa! usa! usa! >> that was the streets of boston and surrounding towns last night, clearly people so excited that
going that route. >> shepard: he matter of reading him his miranda rights. the right to remain silent. there's an exception put into place in 1984 and the intent was, what if somebody placed -- for instance, placed some bombs out there, brought them into custody but more bombs are about to go off you need them to be compelled to speak right now. while waiting to read them their miranda rights. that's an ambiguous thing. do you have a sense now that period of time, whatever it is, has passed and it's time for us to deal with the constitution? >> the theory behind this exception is that the puck is at risk, and the public is so much at risk that the potential defendant's constitutional liberties must be negated. but that doesn't make sense what the same people i just tick off said, the governor, mayor, police, and police commission economy head of the fbi, all said on friday night, boston's back to normal. the public is no longer at recollection. they can't have it both ways. >> shepard: they're trying to. >> can't claim bostones back to normal and the public is not at risk and then say
. should the terrorists in the boston marathon have the miranda rights? of course. should it affect immigration bills and gun bills we'll discuss all that have tonight. before we get to any of that we've got another terrorist attack, but luckily this time it was averted. it was in canada, and we worked together with the canadian authorities. and here is the announcement that it has been aevaluatorred. >> the rmcp confirmed that there was a al-qaida-supported attack. had this plot been carried out it would have resulted in innocent people being killed or seriously injured. >> cenk: now one of the things said about this attack is really puzzling. quote, the two men had direction and guidance from al-qaeda elements located in iran. now that makes no assistance because al-qaeda and sunni eight each other. that's like there was guidance go the united states. at least they made sure that it wasn't carried out no matter where they're from. of course, we're going to talk about boston and the rights associated withdhozvt dhozahar tsarnaev. but in order for me to do that i need to bring in my
before they read miranda rights. this would have falln in the category you can't use this in court but this is what we needed to know if it was more substantive or is that unclear? >> it's not clear whether he provided this information before or after he was read his miranda rights. i don't know. . i know, this is according to a government source, what he has told them in the preliminary investigations. >> jake tapper, thank you very much. obviously significant information there. new information from jake tapper. i want to bring in our panel live tonight. seth jones associate director of the security defense policy center at the rand corporation. former member of the joint terrorism task force and jeffrey toobin our legal analyst. jake is saying -- this is significant in terms of the information in this. but obviously a crucial question out there which is was it obtained before or after those miranda rights were read? >> the irony here is what he is saying is not particularly helpful to him. what would be helpful to him is if he had a conspiracy he could make the government to make
to not or blank or turned his head. if it was given prior to the reading of his miranda rights, it would probably be unlikely they would use that against him in court. if it was used voluntarily afterwards, likely he would. about the fact he has lawyered up, most likely we could send the information probably came prior to his reading of the miranda rights. we don't know that right now. >> thank you very much indeed. an extraordinary court session took place inside his hospital room. a transcript of that hearing tonight that tells us about the accused bomber and the case. jason, tell us what happens, it is fascinating. >> it really is and it is an nine page transcript we got hold of. what i can tell you is this proceeding lasted about ten or 15 minutes, started about 11:30 this morning. all of the key figures came into the hospital room and all of them introduce themselves. you had the u.s. judge there and attorneys from both sides. a court reporter there as well. and everyone present wanted to make sure that he knew exactly what was going on, know about the charges that he is facing. let me read
. >> let's talk about the issue a lot of people have been talking about. not everybody, but some. miranda rights. we've watched enough detective shows no know, police shows, they give miranda rights almost like blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. it's done. why do you think that's an issue? now we just got the word as we went on the air tonight the defendant here, the suspect, i guess he's a defendant now, has been given his miranda rights. >> this is truly something of an urban legend. people like to watch shows where a criminal goes free because he wasn't given miranda rights. that's extremely rare. i do criminal defense work. i can tell you, the most you can hope for in a miranda case is one or two statements will not make it into court. it's rare the whole case falls out unless everything -- >> so it's not the poison fruit thing? >> there is a poison fruit provision, standard. but it's very rare for it to pollute an entire case. >> let me ask you practically, why don't the law enforcement officials, the federal officials up there who have him in custody at the hospital, why didn't they just
of gunfire. >> no miranda warning? >> it is a federal issue somebody else can explain that. >> there was no miranda warning given can we have an explanation? >> there is a public safety exemption with cases of national security with federal charges with an act of terrorism so the government has the opportunity right now so i believe the suspect has been taken to a hospital. thank you. >> is there a federal death penalty? >> i indicated earlier this is an active and ongoing investigation we will be reviewing all of the evidence before that decision is made in terms of whether or not to seek the death penalty. you review all of the evidence and it is a thoughtful, long process that is engaged and the attorney general of the department of justice that makes the final decision. >> can you tell us what happens at the scene was the moving around? how did you know, ? >> we know he did not go straight to the boat. when we set up the perimeter with the best intentions with a lot of information and finding blood in the car , behind a house we had no information he was outtide the per
, again, the suspect is in custody, is alive and that no miranda warning is going to be given. that the public safety exception is being invoked by the department of justice and law enforcement. in order to do a limited and focused interrogation. this is done, in part, when they want to make sure there's no continuing imminent threat. >> and, again, legally, does this in any way imperil their case later if they don't have a miranda warning. >> reporter: now, again, i'm not an attorney, but what this source told me is this is the only recognized exception. in this case, seen or taken by the supreme court. >> and dick clark, weigh in on that, please. >> i'm not a lawyer, either, but my understanding is that any information he gives them, prior to getting his miranda rights probably cannot be used against him in a court of law, but it seems to me they've got enough information against him already. >> i was asking you earlier who would go in the room, what kind of people, how they would talk to him. and they will be recording every single thing that happens from the moment they pi
whether he should be read his miranda rights. >> you're giving them the option, as to whether or not they want to cooperate and i don't believe they should have that option. this is sole will i for the purpose of interrogation to find intelligence to get the intelligence that i believe we need. >> questions remain -- did the brothers have help in carrying out their attacks? >> we're satisfied that the two actors here, the two people that were committing the damage have either been arrested or killed. and the people of the city of boston can rest comfortably at this point in time. >>> but did the fbi miss warning signs after interviewing 26-year-old tamerlan tsarnaev in 2011? where did the brothers get their guns? their training? and their inspiration? >>> in washington, the boston terror attack could become an excuse to slow down immigration reform. >> if ways to improve the bill offered amendment when we start mark-up in may and let's vote on it. i say that particularly those pointing to what happened, the terrible tragedy in boston as a -- i would say excuse for not doing th
enforcement. we know that doesn't quite work for several reasons. one, there is an exception in the miranda rights. when a suspect is read their rights by the police, we're talking about a miranda warning. there is a provision that allows in case law that allows for law enforcement to wait if they think there is a national security threat or a danger to the public until they've talked to the person and established there isn't a danger to the public or gotten the information they need. then they can read the miranda rights. that's what the fbi has done in this case. that's what they did in the new york time square bomber. that worked quite well. they talk to him for a while before they read him his rights. then they read him his rights. he kept and he provided very valuable information. we know that the traditional civilian court system founded by the founding fathers can work in this situation. >> let me ask you a couple questions. if the russian government was so concerned about tamerlan as to alert our fbi and our government, and warrant an investigation of him, why are we so sure that dz
will question him without reading him his miranda rights. we're getting a look at the suspect this morning, a video of tsarnaev, taken during a 2009 wrestling tournament. he's the one wearing the black wrestling uniform there. >>> also, a congressional aide is telling the "boston globe" oversight committees are seeking intelligence or the lack thereof leading up to the boston marathon bombing. for more on the investigation i'm joined by nbc news national investigative correspondent michael isikoff. a good sunday morning to you, mi michael. what are we hearing about the time line when tsarnaev may be charged and the charges he is facing? >> reporter: well, we could see charges against tsarnaev as early as today. i know that federal prosecutors are were preparing them yesterday. actually, we've been told they might come late yesterday afternoon or even last night. they didn't. so it's possible we may now see them this morning. now what that would consist of is not an actual indictment but a criminal complaint backed up by an affidavit most likely from an fbi agent that should have addition a
was read his miranda rights, the 19-year-old charged with one count of using and conspiring to use a weapons of mass destruction of resulting in death. and one count of malicious different stru-- ofproperty, tha maximum penalty of death, federal complain reveals that the tsarnaev brothers were residing in the nation legally, dzhokhar's older brother, tamerlan who was killed friday morning was a lawful permanent resident, one of the two told a carjacking victim thursday night they were the boston marathon bombers, a search of dzhokhar's umass dartmouth dorm room turned up a hat and jacket corne jack y suspect number 2. tsarnaev remains hospitalized at beth israel hospital with gunshot wounds to his head, neck, legs and hands, authorities believe one was sev-inflicted in -- self-inflectioned in a botched suicide attempt. >> canadian authorities announcing in connection with fbi they have broken up a terrorist plot to blow up a passenger train and bridge somewhere between toronto and u.s. border. a ballot they believe had ties to al qaeda overseas. >> the individuals were receiving su
but they don't want to call it an arrest, because the minute you call it an arrest, you have to give miranda warnings. so they could have somebody that they've gone after to question, people observing it within law enforcement think it's going to be an arrest, but from their point of view, they donate want to call it an arrest, because now you're going to trigger miranda warnings and the person's going to go get a lawyer. >> mr. mayor, it's michelle here. what do you make of the progress so far when you see all of the stuff that is on twitter and social media, when you have individuals supplying and examining photos and circling people that have black backpacks, et cetera. is that helpful, and how far, based on what you know, do you think the investigation has gone? >> well, you know, i think it is going to be helpful. it may actually lengthen the investigation, because there's more to go through. you're sort of like, to some extent, looking for a needle in a haystack. but ultimately, the more material that you can get, the better it's going to be. you may have to go through a lot of stuff t
by federal authorities. but in the beginning, he will not be given the usual miranda warning about the right to remain silent. instead, the government will invoke a rule that allows questioning a suspect without giving advice of rights. >> there is a public safety exemption in cases of national security, and central charges involving acts of terrorism, and so government has that opportunity right now. >> the government invoked that same rule in the case of the so-called underwear bomber. as in his case, it allows questioning to learn of any potential plots or accomplices that could present a continuing threat. >> the first questions the fbi will focus on are specific threats that he might be aware of. likely, are there any other improvised explosive devices? were there other people working in the network? the sorts of things that go directly to whether or not there's a continuing threat to public safety. >> reporter: he'll face charges brought by the justice department, because terrorism is a federal crime with a trial in a regular civilian court. and as in other high profile terrorism cases
at first without reading him his miranda rights. when do you expect charges to be filed? >> charges could come as early today. terror charges that could bring the death penalty. he won't be read his miranda rights. they're going to use the public safety can exception. they're taking this extraordinary step because there could be an imminent threat still out there. i just got off the phone, george, with a senior law enforcement, of deep concern of ammunition, guns and working bombs these men had. they were so disciplined. >> any indication of another sleeper cell? >> right now, no evidence of a broader plot involving more people here, but law enforcement officials say they can't take that chance. the investigation is full tilt to find that out. >> okay, pierre, thanks very much. let's get more on this from our team of analysis from our team, dan abrams, brad garrett and richard clarke. dan, let me begin with you. the question about the questioning of the witness, at least at first he will not be read his miranda rights. >> that's right. you heard pierre talk about this public safety except
can he be questioned before the public safety runs out, most say 48 hours. once under miranda he is under no obligation to cooperate with authorities. >> remember the number one goal right here is to get inside his head and get whatever intelligence he has with any operatives in the united states to protect the homeland and protect americans inside the united states. >> reporter: speaking this morning on fox news, former u.s. attorney general alberto gonzales suggested being mirandized will not necessarily close off the flow of information from tsnaraev. >> we have something we can give him which is his life. for example, taking the death penalty off the i believe at that. there is possible some kind of deal would be made where he provides information and in exchange for that the government gives him some kind of a plea agreement. >> reporter: gonzalez suspects what may be happening now is in the obama administration is a quote, interagency scrum where some are pushing for a quick mirandizing. others may be advocating a delay so as much information as possible can be garnered, ma
'll give him a lawyer, lawyer up, get miranda. >> oh, yeah. now, a couple of things about that. they have suggested that there's an exception to miranda for public safety which we all know there is. i think they've been very extravagant in assuming they'll get the largest possible exception under the law and the reality is in different circuits that exception is interpreted differently. >> if they think they don't have to give the guy the miranda rights, you have the right to remain silent and right to an attorney, they think we have a big exemption, before they wofer that and try to get all of the information from the person and it may come back to bite them because some jurisdictions don't see it that way. >> absolutely right. in some places if you're a dangerous offender you get a long exception. in others, it doesn't matter how dangerous you are, if police basically rendered you-- >> what should happen. if we identify the person what do you think as a doj think next. >> in the person fits the definition of enany combatant, al-qaeda affiliate or someone we're at war with, that presiden
and that led to life in prison. >> john: this brings new elements to us. not being a lawyer, the miranda exception to be used on the suspect only if a terror threat seems emanant. can you explain how that works and has that been tested in court before? >> sure, the public safety exemption to miranda allows the fbi to interrogate without mirandaizeing them an without council. this helps them to determine whether or not there is anyone else in the support structure as tim clemente discussed earlier, if there are any support structure and it does present a potential problem a potential evidentiary problem for prosecution at trial in so far a federal judge could decide certain evidence is not admissible in court. but when you look at the massive amount of evidence that has been amassed in this case it's unlikely that they would not be able to get a conviction. it makes sense that they would proceed on this basis empty with the concern of a possible international connection. >> and they miranda mirandaized tim mcveigh but they didn't have as much and he didn't present as a foreign threat. i'v
controversy over miranda rights now pretty much moot. he's been read his rights. he has a lawyer. so that -- that part of the controversy seems to be -- that part of the issue seems to be put aside at this moment. >> let me go to don, michael. when you read the complaint and it says about their homemade bombs, let's go back to what michael was just talking about in the ieds. the complaint says they threw at least two small improvised explosive devices, ieds, out of the car and intact low-grade device was discovered inside the car in addition from the scene of the shootout. the fbi has recovered two unexploded ieds as well as the remnants of numerous exploded ieds. now, does this say to you, when we read numerous exploded ieds, does that support the idea that they planned more attacks to you, don? >> well, you know, al, i think right off the bat, when you look at this circumstance here, clearly this was a planned attack. it not only was a planned attack by the activities that they went about, but if you go back and look, years and months gone back at how these people operated and so o
reading him miranda rights. what does that mean for any information they might be getting? >> well, it's very important to the people -- we've been talking a lot about miranda and i think it's important for people to understand what it does and doesn't mean. if you are questioned without your miranda rights, all that means is that the statements you make cannot be used against you in a criminal court. they can be used against other people. they can be used as leads to other inquiries. and you can still be prosecuted with lots of other evidence. all it means is that those statements cannot be used against you. from what it certainly appears there is lots of other evidence against this fellow. so the fact that the government might be giving up the chance to use some of it is not much of a sacrifice on the part of the government. >> he also at this point could indicate he wants an attorney and doesn't want to answer any questions, correct? >> absolutely. even when someone doesn't get miranda rights, the statements still have to be voluntary. he can't be tortured. he can't be waterboarded.
negotiation with the fbi he gives himself up. >> right. >> they arrest him. they don't read him his miranda rights. explain. >> i'm not great on this. my understanding with the fbi and the federal authorities is that it's a terrorist act that they don't get certain rights that the rest of us would be afforded. they wanted to make sure that if we did speak with him that he wouldn't be given his miranda rights and something else kicked in. he was just -- >> you were told this in advance. if you found the guy, your officers are not going to read him his miranda rights. >> this never played out. there was no interviewing at the scene. he needed aid. >> he was in no position to talk. >> exactly. >> he was a very weak -- did he mumble anything? did he say anything? did he give any political statements? >> my understanding is he didn't have anything to say. i don't know for sure. >> what about during the 20-minute negotiation with the fbi when they were working out his surrender? did he make any statements that could be useful? >> no. i'm not aware of any statements. i think it was more he was fin
but in the beginning he will not be given the usual miranda warning about the right to remain silent. instead, the government will invoke a rule that allows questioning a suspect without giving advice of rights. >> there is a public safety exemption in cases of national security and potential charges involving acts of terrorism and so the government has that opportunity right now. >> reporter: the government invoked the same rule in the case of the so-called underwear bomber. as in his case it allows questioning to learn of any potential plots or accomplices that could present a continuing threat. >> the first questions the fbi will focus on are specific threats that he might be aware of likely are there any other improvised explosive devices, other people working in the network. the sorts of things that go directly to whether or not there's a continuing threat to public safety. >> reporter: he'll face charges brought by the justice department because terrorism is a federal crime with a trial in a regular civilian court. and as in other high profile terrorism cases, some republicans in congre
decided not to read the suspect his miranda warnings and rights. what advantage does that give them now? >> as it was being discussed last night, he is still entitled to his miranda rights. what it means any information they collected before giving that warning cannot be used in court against him. but they probably have a ton of data already. they probably don't need a confession, and they don't need questions that lead to evidence for the prosecution, because they have the video evidence and they have forensic evidence, and i am sure they have dna evidence now because there has been blood and a fight. so they are more interested in trying to get information for him to identify whether there are any more accomplices or relationships to foreigners. >> is there anybody else out there? >> of course, that's question number one. and for the information gathering they are doing now is totally separate from the case they will be making in court. >> they are trying to piece together not just the last few days but in some cases the last year, or more than a last year, and one of the questions is
be read his miranda rights. moving past the politics of it because it seems to get a little poe lit kal, as a former member of fbi how does whether or not the suspect is read his miranda rights influence or impact your investigation? >> it really becomes irrelevant. good report-based interviewers and interrogators who are the ones most effective. the fbi doesn't do that because we're nice. we do that because it worked. in reported based interviewers miranda they can read that and continue. it is not a major obstacle. it is almost irrelevant. jenna: really? we're hearing a it is a major issue whether we get to the bottom of this investigation. so what should we consider as we continue to hear the debate ongoing over the next several days? >> it doesn't, it really doesn't make that much difference to the interviewers and especially the particular group of profile he is -- profilers they developed at quantico, at the fbi academy. this is not terribly relevant. they can sit down with the people. they can interview them. they look for behavioral cues. they look for a way to establish a relat
tsarnaev the 19-year-old surviving suspect be interrogated. should he get his miranda warnings against self-incrimination. tried in a is civilian court or military tribunal. before we go there let's start with the latest from the scene and why craig and a i immediately recognized the pressure cooker bombs. we have seen them many times before. here is craig's crime time report. >> reporter: the quiet streets of watertown became a war zone as the boston marathon bombers made their last stand here. homes can be seen riddled with bullets. this black mark from a pressure cooker bomb, one just like the one that was used to kill three people, wounding 180. >> there was two cars. black suv and a green looked like honda accord. had some bags that he was one of the guys was lighting things and throwing them. had fuses and they would explode but you also lots of shoot going on. >> brothers dhokhar 19 and 26-year-old tamerlan starr tsarnaev add to the marathon death toll, killing police officer shawn collier in cold blood. >> the police officer that was killed you said it was a massacre. >> assassinati
. >> already this row about whether he should have been read his so-called miranda hospital rights. it really underlines the kind of scrutiny this trial is going to be subjected to once it's underway. ,> the scrutiny for the trial but also the scrutiny of the investigation up to this point. people will be wanting to know why the fbi interviewed the older brother in 2011 at the request of the russian government, who were concerned about his links to chechen separatists. at that point they came back and said there was nothing to worry about. ,s president barack obama said they have to find out why two young men who came to this country 10 years ago, who studied here and seem to be part of the fabric of society then suddenly decided to do what they did. who perhaps radicalize them, who guided them? was there someone dictating what they do? ity people leave -- believe is too disillusioned people -- two disillusioned young man working on their own. they will not get a chance to speak to him for the next few days at least. >> thank you. david has a bit more. ,his is the capital of dagestan where th
to find out how much he knows. he's not been read his miranda rights. people are familiar with what mie ran da means. when ever the police arrest somebody stla to tell them that they have the riepght to remain silent and anything they say can be used against them in court. that i plies when there's an immediate threat to the public safety or the offers doing t interrogation. you pointed out there's suspicions and maybe accomplices. we don't know if there were other devices. certainly the fi by is remieing on a lot of what we know. >> you've cut to the very heart of the first and maybe biggest controversy is whether he should be read his rights or encouraged to speak as freely as possible without an attorney present. that's the other part of the miranda proses. the part that you have the right to an attorney. they don't particularly want him to have an attorney right now. >> mie ran y rairanda was invok protect rights. it can impede an investigation but it's to provide personalization and due process. the supreme court was careful in 1984 to charve out this exception to that says if ther
suspect as enemy combat tant. remember, he wasn't read his miranda rights. what would it mean? and why is it important? the constitutional attorney will weigh in on this when we come back. morning, brian! loveour passat! um. listen, gary. i bought the lt one. nice try. says right here you can get one for $199 a month. you can't believe the lame-stream media, gary. they're all gone. maybe i'll get one. [ male announcer ] now everyone's going to want one. you can't have the same car as me, gary! i'm gett' one. nope! [ male announcer ] volkswagen springtoberfest is here and there's no better time to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. right now lease one of four volkswagen models for under $200 a month. visit vwdealer.com today. the battle of bataan, 1942. [ all ] fort benning, georgia, in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto-insurance
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